How To Love The Job You Hate

If you were asked, “Why do you work?” chances are your answer falls into one of these three categories: – “Who wants to be broke? I need to put food on the table.” – “Shockingly, I actually love what I do.” – “Staying at home, not doing anything at a long stretch can get boring […]

If you were asked, “Why do you work?” chances are your answer falls into one of these three categories:
– “Who wants to be broke? I need to put food on the table.”
– “Shockingly, I actually love what I do.”
– “Staying at home, not doing anything at a long stretch can get boring for me.”

If you ask the people who “need to put food on the table” if they like their job, it is very likely that they hate it. We have all been there: paper-pushing, mundane 9-5 jobs that have us looking forward to Fridays and dreading Sundays (except public holidays that fall on Mondays).

How do you love the job you hate?
Practice gratitude: Gratitude can be difficult, especially when you’re in a situation you would rather not be in. Gratitude helps you to see life from a different angle. Instead of looking at it from the angle of having to do the same thing over again, look at it from the angle of the little things you like and what you’re learning, no matter how small. Be grateful because you may not see it then, but you will look back and see that the job was actually teaching you something: patience, respect for people in higher positions, etc. These developments will help you when you do find the job you love. Career coach Kassy Lee says, “Perhaps this job you hate is just part of the exposition, awakening you to the fact that you do crave purpose and meaning in your work.

Negotiate your job description: If your boss is open, speak to him/her about your workload. Let them know whether you are overwhelmed or unchallenged, so that something can be arranged for you. Being able to open up with someone in a higher position could make things better.

Change teams or departments: Has it crossed your mind that it could be the people you work with that may be making work hours challenging? See if your boss is flexible in letting you work in a different field. Do your research on other departments that may play to your strengths before submitting your request to transition.

Find a confidant: Sometimes, all you need to do is vent. Yes, talking to a family member helps, but they may not understand the organization structure and therefore may not be able to empathize with you. Be careful: make sure you can trust this person, knowing that whatever you talk about will not leave you two.

Take advantage of your free time: Sometimes when work is over, we still tend to complain about how much we hate our jobs, that we forget that work is over and we can enjoy the free time we have. Do something you love when you’re not working: exercise, get enough sleep, spend time with your loved ones, learn new and fun things, or even spend time on your passion.

There are a lot of different things you can do to make the work days more bearable. What have you done to love the job you hate? Let us know in the comments.