Nine Questions To Ask Yourself Before Taking That Job Offer

You went for a job interview, and it went well (you even asked the interviewees questions). When you get the offer, you are excited because this means less financial stress, a chance to leave the house every day and something to challenge you on a daily basis. But, you must be careful because in the midst […]

You went for a job interview, and it went well (you even asked the interviewees questions). When you get the offer, you are excited because this means less financial stress, a chance to leave the house every day and something to challenge you on a daily basis. But, you must be careful because in the midst of the excitement, you can actually sell yourself short on what the company is about and what the job really entails.

This calls for some reflection. Take time to consider what this job means to you. Before you accept the job offer, ask yourself these questions:

1. Is this something I want to do?
Go over the responsibilities of the job to see whether any of them make you uncomfortable.

2. Is the work environment somewhere I can be productive?
What is the office space like? Can you be focused and happy in the office? Will you be provided with the resources you will need to succeed? The job may be amazing, but if you feel that you can do more at home than at the office, then there’s a problem.

3. Does this job allow for the lifestyle I want?
What are the hours like? How many days of vacation do you get a year? Is the pay good enough to afford the kind of lifestyle you want? If the answers to these questions are not what you expect, then you may need to reevaluate the job offer.

4. Will I be satisfied professionally?
Before you answer this question, think about your career values – what matters most to you i.e. achievement, recognition, relationships, support and working conditions. Figure this out, and then you can decide if the job will help you create some type of value. In return, find out if the company will help you improve your professional development.

5. Is this job a good fit for my career?
Think about your career path – is this job a short-term or long-term career move? Make sure any job you take is allowing you work towards a career goal.

6. Is this the kind of workplace culture in which I would thrive and be happy?
Try and get a picture of how people interact with each other. Is there a level of trust and respect among colleagues and managers? A good place to start is Glassdoor.

7. What are others saying about this company?
Finding out what other employees and people outside are saying about the company is important. If you accept the offer, you become a representative of the company and its actions reflect on you.

8. Can I live with the commute?
Some people are willing to travel far for a job. In Lagos for example, there are people who live in Ajah, Lekki and work on the mainland. Commuting can drain you before you get to work, leaving you unproductive and stressed for the rest of the day. Science has shown that long commutes (more than ten miles each way, to and from work) lead to high blood sugar levels, high cholesterol, increased risk of depression and decline in happiness and life satisfaction. If the job is something you really want, decide if the commute is worth it.

9. What is my gut saying about this?
You can look at the pros and cons of this situation for as long as you want, but you need to trust yourself. If the job looks good on paper but there’s something in your gut causing you to doubt, it doesn’t hurt to listen to that inner voice.

A job is a commitment that could take up several years of your life, think hard about whether it is worth it or not.