Social Media Addiction: How to Break Free

Social Media Addiction: How to Break Free

Ever gone on Instagram for a quick peek, then find yourself scrolling 500 photos deep down in a stranger’s vacation album? Here’s how to reclaim precious time (and your right mind).

Ever gone on Instagram for a quick peek, then find yourself scrolling 500 photos deep down in a perfect stranger’s vacation album? Here’s how to reclaim precious time (and your right mind).

You are addicted to social media if you become restless or troubled for not visiting social media in a day, if you use social media so much that it has a negative impact on your job/studies, If you use social media to avoid tackling your personal problems, If you can’t have a meal or come across an accident scene without taking a pic and sharing on Social media.

A recent survey reveals that Instagram is the worst social media site in terms of its impact on the mental health of young people. The survey of 1,479 youngsters aged 14 to 24, found Instagram was positive in terms of self-expression and self-identity but the #StatusofMind survey found that the photo-sharing app can negatively impact people’s body image, sleep and fear of missing out. In fact, Facebook addiction shows up in brain scans of those who can’t stay off the site, affecting grey matter in a similar way that cocaine does. Many feel “incomplete” or panic stricken if they go a day without posting on social media. It seems to be the GSM (general street madness) of our time so how does one break free?

Sign off for a Weekend

A two-day break will not cure you of your habit. But you will be surprised about how nice a little time away from the screen can be as an inability to disconnect from your devices could be preventing you from truly enjoying your life. Taking a break unlocks creativity as ideas come when distractions disappear. Use your weekend instead for engaging activities like exercising, meeting and spending time with loved ones, and learning something new.

Check with Purpose

Don’t just wander aimlessly into your social media accounts for no reason, lured by boredom or a need for mindless chatters. Cut back by setting a higher bar for logging on. Ask yourself, do I have a specific, positive reason for this? If you can’t come up with one, resist the urge and do something that will boost your mood. Maybe this is a good time to read that book that has been on your shelf for months? And when was the last time you had a long in-depth conversation with your brother?

Post with purpose

Before you tweet or post a photo, question your motive: Are you just trying to prove that you’re having fun? Is this the 100th picture of your new house that you’ve posted this month? If the answer is yes, try chatting with a friend or texting the picture to your mom. You could also jot down your thoughts in a notebook. When you really process a place by staring at it, writing about it, and reflecting on it, you can create a long-term memory. Posting a photo has the opposite effect: You stop thinking about your experience and start contemplating the response of other people.

Take the apps off your phone

Do you really need to have four apps where you chat with the same people? Why not cut off one, or two, or three? If a certain social media platform isn’t necessary you can delete it from your phone, but still access the platform on your laptop or desktop, the good thing is you’re not carrying around the constant temptation to check in.